Catholic Church – Our Lady & St. Peter

geograph-4336786-by-adrian-cable

Our Lady & St. Peter. © Adrian Cable 2015 and licensed for reuse under a Creative Commons Licence.

Our Lady & St. Peter Church | The Terrace | Aldeburgh | Suffolk | IP15 5HJ

Services

Sundays 11.00 am Mass
Saturdays 5.15  pm Reconciliation
Saturdays 6.00  pm Mass
Holydays 10.00 am Mass
geograph-4336788-by-adrian-cable

© Adrian Cable 2015 and licensed for reuse under a Creative Commons Licence

Parish Priest

Father Tony Rogers | The Presbytery | 15 The Terrace | Aldeburgh | Suffolk | IP15 5HJ
tonybrucerogers@googlemail.com

Brief History

A Catholic Parish was first established in Aldeburgh by the Ursuline Nuns who arrived in  1904.

The first portion of the current church building, comprising nave (part), tower and principal porch, was officially opened on 25 March 1925 by the Bishop of Northampton – see 1925: The new church at Aldeburgh. The Mayor of Aldeburgh was present. The parish priest at that time was Father C. M. Davidson. The architect was Mr. Young who sadly died before the church was opened.

Provision was made for later additions, such as extension of the nave, erection of a sanctuary and inclusion of two side aisles forming side chapels. The church was later extended (date to be established).

During World War 2, the tower suffered bomb damage and it was reduced in height.

The parish has since been extended to include All Saints, Leiston.

Old Postcard Views

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A pre-WW2 view of the church

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A post-WW2 view showing the extended church but with the tower gone

More images

Click here to see more images, external and internal, on Simon K’s Flickr photostream

2016: Centenary of The Battle of the Somme

Friday 1 July marks the centenary of the beginning of The Battle of the Somme. It was the largest battle of the First World War on the Western Front; more than one million men were wounded or killed in the four and a half months it lasted. Among those killed were men from Aldeburgh including:

01-July-1916 Stewart Alexander CRUM
01-July-1916 Philip Squarey HOUGHTON
03-July-1916 Maurice Freshfield JONES
03-July-1916 George MARSHALL 
20-July-1916 Frederick John MOUNTAIN
17-August-1916 Bertie CRACKNELL
22-August-1916 Harry Edward CADY
16-September-1916 Alfred Colby ALLERTON

We will remember them and also:

12-October-1916     Richard HAKEN
12-October-1916     Reginald Ernest PECK

both killed ‘somewhere in France’.

You can read more about these men and all those others who gave their lives during the First World War in “Aldeburgh War Memorial: The story behind the names” by Simon Last and Michael Good.

Then & Now – Oakley Square

Oakley Square – c.1910

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Postcard View of Oakley Square c.1910

Oakley Square – July 2011

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Oakley Square via Google Street View July 2011

Spot the difference!

Perhaps the most obvious is the complete absence of vehicles in the earlier image. The skyline has clearly changed. In the first image the former post office towered above the adjacent high street buildings until it was destroyed by bombs in WW2. In the second image the roof of the catholic church built in the 1920s is clearly visible. It used to have a high tower but that too suffered bomb damage in WW2. And when the church was first constructed, it was half the length!

The backs of 110-118 High Street had changed little, save colour schemes and insertion of a new window.

The building on the left of the square has now gone, as too have the railings on the building on the right (presumably these were removed during WW2 when metal was in such high demand to keep the war machine going).

Can you help?

Do you have any old photographs of Aldeburgh ‘then’? Can you take any photos from a similar angle for Aldeburgh ‘now’? If so, please email us at aldeburgh@oneplacestudy.org